2/9: Fairfield's Ryder Meyer - Mattress Firm Student Athlete of - KFBB.com News, Sports and Weather

2/9: Fairfield's Ryder Meyer - Mattress Firm Student Athlete of the Week

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"I literally fell over on the floor, and I couldn't believe it," said Fairfield sophomore guard Ryder Meyer.

After Fairfield's Ryder Meyer found out one of his closest friends, Lauryn Goldhahn, had been in a fatal car accident, he immediately flew out with other students to Seattle.

"Hoping, you know, obviously that they would be there when she woke up," said Windie Goldhahn, mother of Lauryn. "Even when we knew that wasn't going to happen, they stayed and sat by her side and told stories."

After losing Lauryn, Ryder used her experience to help start: 

"Buckle up blue for Lauryn, which is just a small ribbon you tie on your steering wheel just as a reminder to buckle up when you get in the vehicle," Meyer said.

"He was really close with my sister and I think that had a huge impact on what he wanted to do to help spread the word on the awareness of wearing a seatbelt," said Allix Goldhahn, Lauryn's sister. "He's been there through like everything."

Since launching the campaign, it's gotten bigger than ever imagined.

"43 of the 50 states have reached out to us for ribbons," said Pat Goldhahn, Lauryn's father. "Our family has handed out over 60,000 ribbons."

"When it first started, I was really excited for it, but I didn't know it would go nationwide," Meyer added.

Ryder even spoke in front of the legislature in efforts to make buckling up a primary law.

"But she wasn't wearing her seatbelt, and now I am determined to stop Montana roadway fatalities so that all communities do not have to go through what Fairfield went through," Meyer said.

But the ones who are most affected by Ryder's involvement in the campaign are right at home.

"It means a ton. I think through this, we've had a ton of support. It's been really nice to have people there," Allix said.

"He's just the kind of young man everyone wishes they could have as a son," Pat added. "It's meant a lot to us."

To some, a ribbon may seem like a small thing, but to Ryder and the Fairfield community, it just might save your life.